The Harold Josephson Award for Professional Promise in International Education

Each year, AIEA presents the Harold Josephson Award to deserving graduate students who are making significant contributions to the field of international education. This award was established to honor the memory of Dr. Josephson, a long-time leader in AIEA and Associate Vice Chancellor of International Programs at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, who died in 1998.

Effective 2017, AIEA will recognize two (2) Josephson awardees, in light of the changing demographics of our field. 

  • One award, the Student Professional award, will be made to an advanced graduate student in any field who has already entered the professional ranks, and has distinguished him or herself as an emerging leader in international education. 

  • The other award, the Student Award, will recognize a graduate student in any discipline who has demonstrated exceptional promise in the field through research, campus activities, or other relevant contributions. 

Award recipients in both categories will be listed in the annual conference program and recognized during the conference.  Both recipients will receive complimentary conference registration, and the Student Award recipient  will be provided a $1,000 travel grant to attend.  

Pictured: 2017 Josephson Award Recipients Laura Burbano (L) and Brianne Holden (R) 

Criteria and Nomination Process

Nominees may be at the masters or doctoral level, in any disciplinary area.  Nominations should provide specific examples of the student’s leadership roles, which may include: research and original scholarship in a relevant field; teaching or advising that is informed by and promotes the values of international education; and/or program development or other relevant initiatives. Nominations may also refer to other tangible recognitions from the home institution (outstanding graduate teaching award, leadership in graduate governance on the campus, campus nomination for Fulbright, NSEP, or other nationally competitive awards). The addition of a curriculum vitae for the candidate is helpful but not formally required. Nominators need not be AIEA members or from AIEA member institutions. Nominees should be from a member institution. 

Nominations should be submitted by October 1: Harold Josephson Award Nomination Form

Past Recipients  

2017 Recipient - Brianne Holden, University of California Davis 

Brianne Holden is a Study Abroad Coordinator at the University of California, Davis. She developed her passion for culture and travel during a high school exchange program in Thailand. As an undergraduate, she studied abroad in Spain before earning her bachelors degree in Global Cultures from the University of California, Irvine. Brianne worked as a Study Abroad Advisor at the University of Oregon, from where she recently graduated with a Master’s degree in International Studies. Brianne’s thesis entitled Third Country Study: The Role of Degree-Seeking International Students as Study Abroad Participants examines the perspective of matriculating international students; and assesses the opportunities, obstacles and resources they experience at the University of Oregon as they consider, prepare for, and participate- or not- in study abroad programs.
Poster (.pdf) 
2017 Harold Josephson Award Press Release (.pdf)

2017 Recipient - Laura Burbano, University of Oregon

Laura Anais Burbano-Bayuelo is a graduate student at University of Oregon in the Department of International Studies. Laura has a BA in international affairs and political studies from Nueva Granada Military University in Bogotá, Colombia. She currently works for the Migrant Education Program at Springfield Public Schools as a bilingual assistant. Laura has worked as community organizer and consultant, graduate teaching assistant, research assistant, Spanish teacher, and co-coordinator of a multicultural summer camp. She is an advocate for migrant students with the goal of increasing awareness of the circumstances that might affect negatively their pursuit of high school graduation. Laura’s research focuses on the impact that Oregon Migrant Leadership Institute has had in the lives of migrant students through the narratives of students who attended the summer program. Her study highlights and expands upon the program’s successful elements, discussions, and strategies that aided students to pursue academic involvement beyond high school.
2017 Harold Josephson Award Press Release (.pdf)

2016 Recipient - Svetlana Fileatreau, George Mason University 

Svetlana Filiatreau is the Manager for Global Learning Integration in the Office of Global Strategy at George Mason University. Ms. Filiatreau’s research expertise is in university leadership and education for engaged citizenship, comprehensive internationalization, and development of academic cross-border partnerships. The role of university leadership in student ethical and civic development in Ukraine was the topic of her doctoral research. Svetlana has more than twenty years of combined experience in building cross-border partnerships in higher education, coalition building and community-based development, and teaching in school and community settings. She holds a Master’s degree in Applied Theology with the focus in community-based development from Regent College (Vancouver, Canada) and a PhD in International Education from George Mason University.
Poster (.pdf) | Presentation (.pdf)
Josephson Award Press Release 2016 (.pdf) 

2016 Recipient - Leanna Jenkins, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Leanna Jenkins is an International Student Advisor and a graduate student at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly). In her short time at Cal Poly, Leanna has coordinated numerous international student support programs, and has served on the International Student Retention & Success Task Force. She continually seeks out new initiatives to facilitate international student success, and recently implemented a cross-cultural program that connects international students with the local community. Leanna will graduate in June 2016 with a Counseling & Guidance Master’s degree in Education. Her graduate research focuses on issues affecting international student success and retention in higher education. Leanna’s interest in this area stems from her own experience living abroad in Japan as an international student.
Josephson Award Press Release 2016 (.pdf) 

2015 Recipient - Bethany Galipeau-Konate, Shenandoah University  

Bethany Galipeau-Konate is Director of International Programs at Shenandoah University. She has ten years of experience in international education, with expertise in international recruitment, short-term education abroad programming, and higher education administration. Bethany recently defended her dissertation focusing on the long-term impacts of a short-term education abroad program on global citizenship outcomes and was awarded the degree of Doctor of Professional Studies in Organizational Leadership at Shenandoah University. She is a returned Peace Corps volunteer (Mali, 2003-2005) and holds an MBA from Shenandoah University. 
Josephson Award Press Release 2015 (.pdf) 

2014 Recipient - Christine A. Farrugia,  Institute of International Education (IIE)

Christine A. Farrugia is Senior Research Officer at the Institute of International Education (IIE) where she leads Open Doors, a large-scale annual survey of international educational exchange in the U.S. She has over twelve years of experience as a university administrator and researcher of higher education. Her areas of expertise include cross-border higher education, the organization and administration of higher education institutions, quality assurance, access to higher education, and higher education policy. Christine is a current PhD candidate in Educational Administration & Policy Studies at the State University of New York at Albany where her dissertation research focuses on cross-border higher education policy in the United Arab Emirates. She also holds Ed.M. and M.A. degrees in Higher & Postsecondary Education from Teachers College, Columbia University.
Josephson Award Press Release 2014 (.pdf) 

2013 Recipient - Karen Gardenier, Colorado State University

Karen Gardenier is a doctoral candidate in the School of Education at Colorado State University (CSU). The focus of her studies is higher education administration and international development. Her dissertation research utilizes Mezirow’s theory of transformative learning to examine student learning on an alternative break program to Kenya. Part of her interest in this project stems from her own international experiences, including teaching English in Kyrgyzstan as a Peace Corps volunteer from 2002-2004. Karen is an Assistant Director in the Office of International Programs at CSU where she works with Peace Corps programs, US Student Fulbright and several internationally focused academic programs. She enjoys hiking in Colorado, traveling to new places, and art and music from around the globe.
Josephson Award Press Release 2013 (.pdf) 

2012 Recipient - Jason Pedicone, Princeton University

Jason Pedicone is a sixth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Classics Department at Princeton. Over the course of his studies, Jason spent time in the German, Italian, and French university systems. His most meaningful experiences abroad were his Fulbright fellowship to Munich and his year in Rome, where he learned conversationally Latin from Fr. Reginald Foster, the Vatican’s Secretary of Latin letters. These experiences inspired him to found the Paideia Institute in 2011.

The Paideia Institute is an educational non-profit organization with the mission of promoting the humanities through innovative educational programming in Europe. The Institute’s first program−a unique, five-week spoken Latin seminar called ‘Living Latin in Rome’−ran in 2011 and drew international media attention. The Institute is in the process of expanding its programming and has plans to establish a semester program in Rome. It is eager to discuss opportunities for collaborations with potential partner universities. Jason's dissertation is on the Birth of the Lyric Genre in Greece and Rome.

2011 Recipient - Leasa Weimer, University of Colorado Boulder

Leasa Weimer is a third year doctoral student in the University of Georgia Institute for Higher Education. Currently, she serves as the Graduate Fellow for the Franklin Residential College and works as a Graduate Assistant in the Office of International Education. In addition, she has served as a teaching assistant for the UGA Costa Rica spring break study abroad program and the Global LEAD South African summer study abroad program. In 2009, she lived, worked, and studied for six months as a Graduate Resident in the UGA Oxford program. Her research agenda focuses on the political economy and the international student market. Prior to pursuing a PhD, she was awarded a European Union Erasmus Mundus scholarship wherein she completed a joint master’s degree program, living and studying in Oslo, Norway; Tampere, Finland; and Aveiro, Portugal. Leasa earned a bachelor’s degree in Communication and Psychology from the University of Colorado Boulder.

2010 Recipient - Martha Bloem, University of Texas at Austin

Martha Bloem is a second-year graduate student at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on the intersection of education policy and international affairs, and how greater access to higher education leads to sustainable socioeconomic development in developing countries. Ms. Bloem is the Sponsored Student Graduate Assistant in the UT International Office, facilitating the admission and placement of sponsored international students. Ms. Bloem has also served on various selection committees for international education scholarships, and she designed a cultural curriculum for Rice University’s sponsored student programs. Prior to graduate school, Ms. Bloem was the Program and Development Coordinator at Minds Matter of NYC, Inc., an academic mentoring nonprofit that helps high-achieving, low-income high school students in their pursuit of a college education. Ms. Bloem graduated from UT-Austin with a bachelor’s degree in Cultural and Social Anthropology.

2009 Recipient - Elizabeth Stallman, University of Minnesota

Elizabeth Stallman is a Ph.D. candidate in comparative and international development education at the University of Minnesota; she will graduate in May 2009. Her dissertation is a mixed-methods investigation of intercultural competence and racial identity among White American undergraduates who study abroad. She is the lead research assistant on a three-year, federally-funded research project investigating the long-term impact of study abroad on alumni’s global citizenship. She received her M.A. in international educational development from Teachers College, Columbia University, where she also served as assistant director of International Services. She received her B.A. in international politics from Penn State University. From 1994 to 1996 she was a participant on the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program for which she taught English to Japanese high school students in Shizuoka, Japan.

2008 Recipient - Mark Salisbury, University of Iowa

Mark Salisbury is a doctoral student in Student Affairs Administration and Research and a research assistant in the Center for Research on Undergraduate Education at the University of Iowa. He was the co-principle researcher on the University of Iowa Internationalization Assessment Project in conjunction with the American Council onEducation Internationalization Laboratory. Salisbury is also a recipient of the 2007 Paul Opstad Scholarship for his work on behalf of international students. He has over a decade of experience working in higher education, including programming for international and honors students, researching and implementing strategic initiatives for enrollment planning, advising undergraduates, and coaching intercollegiate soccer at three different institutions. He earned his Master’s Degree in American Studies from the University of Kansas in 1997.

2007 Recipient - Dawn Graham, Purdue University

Dawn Graham is a fourth-year doctoral candidate in counseling psychology at Purdue University. She is presenting her two-year longitudinal study on intercultural competence and problem solving among short-term study abroad students. She has worked at Purdue’s Study Abroad Office for the past two-and-a-half years under the direction of Assistant Dean Brian Harley and Dean Riall Nolan. Her current studies continue to bridge the disciplines of psychology and international education. She studied as an undergraduate in the UK and has traveled to more than 20 countries. Graham received her Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of Evansville and her Master of Arts in applied behavioral science: counseling from Valparaiso University in Indiana.

2006 Recipient - Michele S. Schwietz, University of Pittsburgh

Michele S. Schwietz is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Pittsburgh who will graduate in April 2006. Her dissertation, "Internationalization of the Academic Profession: An Exploratory Study of Faculty Attitudes, Beliefs and Involvement Regarding the Internationalization of Higher Education at Public Universities in Pennsylvania," analyzes data from over 800 faculty at nine universities. She receiced a grant from the University of Pittsburgh and published two book reviews in the journal of College Student Development. Michele received MA in Student Affairs in Higher Education and a BA in Spanish from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Michele completed an internship at IIE in Washington, D.C. and studied abroad in Spain and Mexico. She has over 20 years of experience in research and administration and is the Assistant Dean od Research at IUP. She has written grant proposals funded by the U.S. Department of Education and the Kresge Foundation.

2005 Co-Recipients - Jill Hermsen, University of Missouri, Columbia; Nicole Lamers, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

2002 Recipient - Donald Staub